Protest Emigration (Hijrat)

Protest emigration, also called hijrat, is the intentional emigration from an area usually a country or particular government that is charged with some specific unfairness, cruelty, or other form of injustice by a certain group of people. The group migrates from the oppressing area and quits all social cooperation as a form of protest demonstrating their dissatisfaction with the current situation. In some situations the emigration is to be permanent such as the Hijrat Movement of the Muslims during the 1920s. Other times however, the protest emigration is only temporary and is intended to bring about some form of change. This is usually the case when the oppressing country or government desires the cooperation of the opposed group of people.
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Collective Disappearance

One form of social withdrawal that has been used to avoid participating in a practice that is considered repugnant is to simply disappear. Amazingly, this act has been orchestrated not only by individuals but by entire populations. While the populations in question are generally small—a rural village for example—the fact that it involves a number of people can make a powerful statement. It can also cause a bit of havoc for the opposing faction.
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Sanctuary

Sanctuary is a means of nonviolent protest through social noncooperation. An individual or a group of people withdraw from society and seek refuge in a place where the opposition cannot go without contravening religious, moral, social, or legal constraints. In order to be successful, the sanctuary movement must cause enough discomfort to and embarrassment for the opposition, so that the protest demands are accepted. In the past, places of sanctuary were usually sacred places or buildings that were believed to be untouchable. Today, places of sanctuary might be more symbolic, such as student unions or administrative offices.
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“Flight” of Workers

Through the centuries, there have been many times that groups of people used flight and cessation of work by leaving their jobs, their homes, or their countries, to demonstrate to the opponent, the degree of unity and self-discipline a populace can have to make an impact on the rulings and behaviors of their opponent.
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Total Personal Noncooperation

Total personal noncooperation is a form of non violent protest designed to make the point that the imprisonment of a protestor is unjustified on moral or political grounds. In order to complete this form of protest an individual or group must withdraw all their cooperation with the authorities of a state as they pass through the legal system from arrest through to imprisonment and release on parole. Total noncooperation requires a complete withdrawal from the legal system with some risoners refusing to eat, drink or dress themselves; in essence the prisoner completing the protest refuses to do everything apart from breathe for themselves.
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Stay-at-Home

One of the more novel and effective forms of social protest, pioneered during the South African civil rights struggle and Eastern Europe’s resistance to communism in the 1950s, is the “stay-at-home.” In this particular form of protest, peopled refuse to leave their homes. They abandoned all public places and entertainment districts. The corrupt leaders and oppressive governments were left with the spectacle of deserted streets, stores, and offices.
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