Political Mourning

As many as 30,000 Argentineans may have vanished between 1976 and 1983 during a period of violence, sanctioned by that country’s ruling military regime that has come to be called the Dirty War. Among those who disappeared were 172 children. In 1977, mothers of these missing children and their sympathizers began holding mourning vigils at Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires. The Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo’s insistence upon confronting those in power with the memories of the dead gave rise to a powerful social organization that garnered international attention and respect, and remained active inside Argentina until 2006.
Continue reading

Demonstrative Funerals

When a person is killed during the course of a peaceful protest, or by the person or cause being protested, it can lead to a demonstrative funeral. Also if a person is killed who is an innocent bystander, but has been victimized by the cause one is objecting to, this can also can be cause for a demonstrative funeral.
Continue reading

Homage at Burial Places

Paying homage at burial places is one of many ways to engage in nonviolent protest. Nonviolent protests, such as paying homage, have been known to achieve their ends for centuries. While many in this world prefer violence as a means to end, nonviolent activities and protests are a more positive method to achieving one’s goals.
Continue reading

Mock Funerals

Mock funerals are used to symbolically show that certain ideals and principles have met with certain death due to the way things are currently going in a society. They can also be used to suggest that there is a danger to human life if certain policies are put into place. A means of protest, mock funerals were used successfully in early American History in the colonial days.
Continue reading